“Circle a target, performing 2 powerful strafing runs and suppressing buildings (causing them to operate slower). To deploy our aircraft, tap any building, or unit in enemy's base. When they've finished their attack, they may be redeployed.”

Historical Description[edit | edit source]

With the age of jet fighters well underway, the United States Air Force needed a replacement for the successful but aging F-4 Phantom II. McDonnell Douglas, which later merged with Boeing, won the contract to produce what would become the F-15 Eagle. Not long after its first flight in July 1972, test versions were shattering time-to-climb records. The model entered U.S. service in 1976 and it achieved its first victory under the Israeli air force three years later.

The Eagle can support a variety of armaments, from close-range Gatling cannons to long-distance air-to-air missiles and even nuclear bombs. Its advanced targeting systems and maneuverability have made it an invincible aerial fighter with over 100 kills and zero losses. Understandably reluctant to part with such a powerful weapon, the U.S. has only exported it to Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Japan. Though the F-22 Raptor started to replace the F-15 in the mid-2000s, newer Eagle variants will continue to fly for the foreseeable future.


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