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Armour Artifacts are artifacts used to boost town defenses. The Artifacts are crafted, displayed and empowered at the Museum.

Benefits[]

Benefits will be random for each artifact, starting at either 1%, 6% or 11% (can be upgraded)

Defender[]

  • Defender Hitpoints
  • Defender Damage

Invading Troops' Hitpoints[]

Invading Troops' Damage / Healing[]

List of Armour Artifacts[]

Europe


Helmet (Viking)[]

Viking Helmet[]

Contrary to popular depictions, there is no evidence that Vikings wore horned helmets. This image seems to have originated in 19th century art, particularly the costumes for Richard Wagner's operatic Ring cycle. It may also have roots in ceremonial horned headgear worn by ancient pagan priests. Historical Viking warriors likely used bowl-shaped iron helmets lined with leather, sometimes adding nose or eye guards.

Leif Ericsson's Helmet[]

The Icelandic explorer Leif Eriksson is considered the first European to have set foot in the Americas. He was the son of Erik the Red, who founded the first Norse settlements in Greenland. Leif did not colonize the lands he found; other Vikings soon did, but were likely driven out by the indigenous Skraelings.

Contrary to popular depictions, there is no evidence that Vikings wore horned helmets. This image seems to have originated in 19th century art, particularly the costumes for Richard Wagner's operatic Ring cycle. It may also have roots in ceremonial horned headgear worn by ancient pagan priests. Historical Viking warriors likely used bowl-shaped iron helmets lined with leather, sometimes adding nose or eye guards.

Helmet (Greek and Rome)[]

Galea Helmet[]

The most iconic features of classical Greek and Roman helmets was the tall horsehair crest. According to the writings of Homer and others, these were meant to strike terror into the hearts of enemies, probably by making wearer appear taller. For a Roman centurion, the crest on his galea helmet also served as a mark of status and let his troops find him more easily in the heart of battle.

Julius Caesar’s Helmet[]

Gaius Julius Caesar first gained popular support by throwing lavish games on borrowed money. He led a series of masterful campaigns to conquer Gaul (modern France), then defeated his rivals to claim sole power in Rome. This paved the way for his adopted son Octavian to become the first Roman emperor.

The most iconic feature of classical Greek and Roman helmets was the tall horsehair crest. According to the writings of Homer and others, these were meant to strike terror into the hearts of enemies, probably by making the wearer appear taller. For a Roman centurion, the crest on his galea helmet also served as a mark of status and let his troops find him more easily in the heat of battle.

Helm (Holy Roman Empire)[]

Close Helm[]

Helmets evolved into a variety of styles throughout the Middle Ages. The close helm was a late development whose use continued into the early Renaissance. As might be guessed, helmets of this type enclosed the entire head. They featured a hinged visor that pivoted downward to protect the lower face and neck. Effective and stylish, close helms were popular both on the battlefield and in the tourney lists.

Emperor Maxmilian's Helm[]

Through wars and political marriages, Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I paved the way for his Habsburg dynasty to dominate the royal houses of Europe. He also sponsored the arts and sciences, formed the first Landsknechts, and carried out administrative reforms. A style of plate armor now bears his name.

Helmets evolved into a variety of styles throughout the Middle Ages. The close helm was a late development whose use continued into the early Renaissance. As might be guessed, helmets of this type enclosed the entire head. They featured a hinged visor that pivoted downward to protect the lower face and neck. Effective and stylish, close helms were popular both on the battlefield and in the tourney lists.

Hussar Wings[]

Hussar Wings[]

The Polish heavy cavalry known as the Winged Hussars were the terror of 17th-century Europe. Their reasons for wearing feathered 'wings' are uncertain. It is possible that the wooden frames provided some protection, but the main purpose was likely to intimidate foes. The wings may have produced an ominous sound, made the horsemen look taller, or merely advertised the presence of the dreaded Hussars.

Jan Sobieski’s Hussar Wings[]

The learned Polish monarch Jan Sobieski commanded the force that relieved the Ottoman siege of Vienna in 1683. Taking a mountainous forest route that the Turks had deemed impossible, Sobieski led his Winged Hussars in a decisive charge. His victory finally stemmed the Ottoman advances into Europe.

The Polish heavy cavalry known as the Winged Hussars were the terror of 17th-century Europe. Their reasons for wearing feathered 'wings' are uncertain. It is possible that the wooden frames provided some protection, but the main purpose was likely to intimidate foes. The wings may have produced an ominous sound, made the horsemen look taller, or merely advertised the presence of the dreaded Hussars.

Tunic (Greek and Rome)[]

Chiton Tunic[]

The tunic was basic upper body wear for all Greeks and Romans. Both men and women wore them, though generally in different styles. Unlike modern t-shirts, they fell below the hips and had extra fabric that was arranged and then fastened with pins called fibulae. Respectable Romans wore traditional garments over their tunics: the toga for men, and a long sleeveless dress known as the stola for women.

Herodotus' Tunic[]

Herodotus is known as the father of history. He was the first to explain the past in terms of cause and effect, and to investigate it through methodical inquiry and research. His 'Histories' not only narrate the Persian Wars but also include valuable ethnographic information about Persia's subjects and neighbors.

The tunic was basic upper body wear for all Greeks and Romans. Both men and women wore them, though generally in different styles. Unlike modern t-shirts, they fell below the hips and had extra fabric that was arranged and then fastened with pins called fibulae. Respectable Romans wore traditional garments over their tunics: the toga for men, and a long sleeveless dress known as the stola for women.

Cuirass[]

Napoleonic Cuirass[]

The cuirassiers were Napoleon's heavy cavalry. Expected to overwhelm the enemy by sheer force, they were big men on powerful horses. Their namesake steel cuirass (upper body armor) warded off melee attacks and pistol fire. While the French were considered poor horsemen individually, their ability to maintain formation and charge en masse rendered these imposing troopers decisive on the battlefield.

General d'Hautpoul's Cuirass[]

Jean-Joseph Ange d'Hautpoul was one of Napoleon's veteran cavalry commanders. Gigantic in size and strength, he epitomized the physical prowess of the cuirassier. He broke the Russian lines at Austerlitz and again at Eylau, where he sustained fatal wounds in one of history's greatest cavalry charges.

The cuirassiers were Napoleon's heavy cavalry. Expected to overwhelm the enemy by sheer force, they were big men on powerful horses. Their namesake steel cuirass (upper body armor) warded off melee attacks and pistol fire. While the French were considered poor horsemen individually, their ability to maintain formation and charge en masse rendered these imposing troopers decisive on the battlefield.

Boots[]

Caligae Boots[]

All Roman soldiers wore boots called caligae. The open design of the leather straps prevented blisters and kept the wearer's feet comfortable, while iron hobnails in their soles made them more durable and improved their traction. The emperor we know as Caligula got his nickname from the adorable little caligae he wore as a child accompanying his father Germanicus on campaign.

Agrippa's Boots[]

While Augustus tends to get all the glory for being the first Roman emperor, his military talents did not match his political genius. For victory on the battlefield, he relied on his friend Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa. It was Agrippa whose fleet crushed the forces of Mark Anthony at the decisive Battle of Actium in 31 BC.

All Roman soldiers wore boots called caligae. The open design of the leather straps prevented blisters and kept the wearer's feet comfortable, while iron hobnails in their soles made them more durable and improved their traction. The emperor we know as Caligula got his nickname from the adorable little caligae he wore as a child accompanying his father Germanicus on campaign.

Asia


Helmet (Korea)[]

Chul Mo Helmet[]

During Korea's Joseon Dynasty, officers wore tall conical helmets crested with plumes of feathers. The helmets of common soldiers typically had shorter rounded tops as well as brims to ward off downward blows and falling projectiles. While some helmets included protection for the sides of the head, they tended to leave the face exposed.

Kim Yu-sin's Helmet[]

Kim Yu-sin was a renowned general of the Silla kingdom whose campaigns led to the unification of Korea in the 7th century. He crushed Silla’s rival kingdoms of Baekje and Goguryeo with help from Tang China. When the Tang forces overstayed their welcome, Kim led a combined Korean army to drive them out.

During Korea's Joseon Dynasty, officers wore tall conical helmets crested with plumes of feathers. The helmets of common soldiers typically had shorter rounded tops as well as brims to ward off downward blows and falling projectiles. While some helmets included protection for the sides of the head, they tended to leave the face exposed.

Armor (China)[]

Kaijia Armor[]

Ancient Chinese armor was crafted from leather, bronze, or iron. Equipment was not standardized, as shown by variations among the soldiers of the Terracotta Army. Officers wore high-quality metal while poorer conscripts often lacked any protection at all. Improbable though it may seem, armor made of paper was evidently used and even esteemed for its combination of protection and mobility.

Sun Tzu's Armor[]

The Art of War is probably the most influential treatise ever written on strategy. It is attributed to a general from China's Spring and Autumn Period named Sun Tzu, though his existence is now debated. The work considers all aspects of war: communication, logistics, morale, psychology, the use of spies, and more.

Ancient Chinese armor was crafted from leather, bronze, or iron. Equipment was not standardized, as shown by variations among the soldiers of the Terracotta Army. Officers wore high-quality metal while poorer conscripts often lacked any protection at all. Improbable though it may seem, armor made of paper was evidently used and even esteemed for its combination of protection and mobility.

Armor (Japan)[]

Yoroi Armor[]

Early samurai wore boxy armor called o-yoroi. Designed for mounted archery, it featured large squarish guards made up of small steel plates laced with leather. Over time, o-yoroi was replaced by more flexible styles. The culmination of this trend was tosei-gusoku or 'modern armor,’ which offered some protection against gunfire and was easier to maintain on the long campaigns of the late Warring States period.

Oda Nobunaga's Armor[]

When Oda Nobunaga took power in 1551, he was a minor warlord from an insignificant clan. He proved a cunning strategist, especially in devising tactics for the newly imported tanegashima firearms. By the time of his death, he controlled over half of Japan. He is now remembered as the first of its three great unifiers.

Early samurai wore boxy armor called o-yoroi. Designed for mounted archery, it featured large squarish guards made up of small steel plates laced with leather. Over time, o-yoroi was replaced by more flexible styles. The culmination of this trend was tosei-gusoku or 'modern armor,’ which offered some protection against gunfire and was easier to maintain on the long campaigns of the late Warring States period.

Armor (Korea)[]

Dujeonggap Armor[]

One style of Korean armor was the dujeonggap or brigandine, in which iron plates were sewn between layers of fabric and reinforced with metal studs. Another was the gyeongbeongap, chainmail that had iron plates embedded into certain sections. In the 1860s, under threat from Western powers, Korea developed cotton armor called myeonje baegap that was apparently effective in stopping bullets.

Admiral Yi's Armor[]

Admiral Yi Sun-shin is one of Korea's greatest heroes. Despite repeated setbacks from the machinations of jealous court rivals, he almost single-handedly repelled Toyotomi Hideyoshi's invasions. Yi's ingenious tactics and impenetrable turtle ships enabled him to defeat much larger fleets, rarely losing a single ship.

One style of Korean armor was the dujeonggap or brigandine, in which iron plates were sewn between layers of fabric and reinforced with metal studs. Another was the gyeongbeongap, chainmail that had iron plates embedded into certain sections. In the 1860s, under threat from Western powers, Korea developed cotton armor called myeonje baegap that was apparently effective in stopping bullets.

Africa


Helmet[]

Bronze Helmet[]

This bronze helmet dates back to 15th or 16th century Egypt. The helmet is based on the Ottoman 'chichak' style, which usually features a nose guard, cheek flaps, a neck flap, and a conical shape. Sometimes additional protection was added to the helmet in the form of chainmail, which better protected the neck.

An-Nasir Muhammad's Helmet[]

An-Nasir Muhammad was a Sultan of Egypt during the Mamluk Sultanate. An-Nasir had three separate reigns as ruler of Egypt. He was only nine years old when his first reign started and it only lasted one year before he was deposed and sent to a different dity. Five years later, An-Nasir was recalled to Cairo to rule after the previous Sultan was deposed. An-Nasir's second reign lasted ten years and during that time, he defended Egypt from Mongol invaders at the battle of Marj al-Saffar. His second reign ended when he went on a pilgrimage and his Vice-Sultan took control for ten months. Upon his return, An-Nasir arrested and executed his former Vice-Sultan and became Sultan for the third time.

This bronze helmet dates back to 15th or 16th century Egypt. The helmet is based on the Ottoman 'chichak' style, which usually features a nose guard, cheek flaps, a neck flap, and a conical shape. Sometimes additional protection was added to the helmet in the form of chainmail, which better protected the neck.

Mask[]

Elephant Mask[]

The Elephant Mask is a status symbol Within the Bamileke people of Cameroon. Elephant Masks are created using beads, cloth, and other fibers, and can only be worn by those deemed worthy by the Kuosi, the Mask society. The mask is only one part of the elaborate costume. The full costume consists of a long, colorfully decorated robe, a hand-held fly whisk, a large headdress, and sometimes a leopard pelt.

King Ndéh's Mask[]

Ancestors of the Bamileke people are said to have originated in ancient Egypt, which they left around the 9th century. One of the most famous leaders of the Bamileke people was King Ndéh. Not much is known about the ancient King Ndéh, but the kingdom he reigned over fractured upon his death in 1357.

The Elephant Mask is a status symbol Within the Bamileke people of Cameroon. Elephant Masks are created using beads, cloth, and other fibers, and can only be worn by those deemed worthy by the Kuosi, the Mask society. The mask is only one part of the elaborate costume. The full costume consists of a long, colorfully decorated robe, a hand-held fly whisk, a large headdress, and sometimes a leopard pelt.

Tunic[]

Crocodile Tunic[]

Not much is known about the the use of crocodile skin as armor or clothing in ancient Egypt. Crocodiles were worshiped and revered, so the tunics and hoods may have been used to channel the ferocity of the crocodile in combat or as a symbol to invoke the crocodile’s spirit during rituals. Their use in Egypt dates back to the 3rd century CE and there have even been crocodile armor pieces found in the Roman Empire!

Ptolemy II's Tunic[]

Ptolemy II was a Pharaoh of Egypt from 285-246 BCE. During his reign he pushed for the redevelopment and expansion of temples dedicated to the god Sobek. Sobek is an Egyptian deity that is normally represented as a human with the head of a crocodile. Sobek is associated with pharaonic power, fertility, and military prowess.

Not much is known about the the use of crocodile skin as armor or clothing in ancient Egypt. Crocodiles were worshiped and revered, so the tunics and hoods may have been used to channel the ferocity of the crocodile in combat or as a symbol to invoke the crocodile’s spirit during rituals. Their use in Egypt dates back to the 3rd century CE and there have even been crocodile armor pieces found in the Roman Empire!

Armor[]

Bornu Armor[]

This type of armor was worn by the mounted cavalry riders from the Bornu Empire that existed from 1396-1893 in modern-day Chad, Nigeria, and Cameroon. The armor was made of quilted cotton and covered the warrior and his horse; it was primarily used to help protect against arrows. The armor was usually colorful and distinctly patterned.

Idris Alooma's Armor[]

Idris Alooma was a king of the Kanem-Bornu Empire in the 16th century, famous for his military prowess and administrative reforms that ushered in the height of Kanem-Bornu power. The administrative reforms he enacted were guided by his Islamic beliefs. He also greatly improved trade during his reign. He focused on keeping routes clear and safe, as well as standardizing units of measurement for grain. This type of armor was worn by the mounted cavalry riders from the Bornu Empire that existed from 1396-1893 in modern-day Chad, Nigeria, and Cameroon. The armor was made of quilted cotton and covered the warrior and his horse; it was primarily used to help protect against arrows. The armor was usually colorful and distinctly patterned.

America


Headdress[]

Native American Headdress[]

A War Bonnet is a headdress that is worn by Native American leaders who have earned the respect and honor of their tribe. An individual must first earn the formal recognition from his people before being given a War Bonnet. These headdresses were adorned with eagle feathers, as most tribes considered the eagle to be the greatest of all birds. While originally worn during warfare, the War Bonnet is now primarily used for ceremonial purposes.

Red Cloud's Headdress[]

Red Cloud was a renowned warrior and leader of the Oglala Lakota subtribe. For several years he fought against the United States Army in what was called Red Cloud’s War. During this conflict Red Cloud was responsible for the U.S. Army’s largest military defeat until the Battle of Little Bighorn a decade later. This defeat caused the U.S. to settle for a peace treaty in which they agreed to withdraw completely from Lakota territory.

A War Bonnet is a headdress that is worn by Native American leaders who have earned the respect and honor of their tribe. An individual must first earn the formal recognition from his people before being given a War Bonnet. These headdresses were adorned with eagle feathers, as most tribes considered the eagle to be the greatest of all birds. While originally worn during warfare, the War Bonnet is now primarily used for ceremonial purposes.

Armor (Tlingit)[]

Tlingit Armor[]

The Tlingit people were known to make elaborate armor and helmets. Heavy sets of armor were made from straight pieces of wood tied together with rawhide. Their helmets and neck guards were more decorated, designed to look like fierce animals or human heads. This armor was reportedly strong enough to repel the bullets of the Russians who colonized the northwestern coast of America.

Gush X'een Tlingit Armor[]

Gush X’een was the first in a long succession of Shakes,or leaders, of a clan of Tlingit people. Stories say that an opposing tribal leader named Wiisheyksh attempted to take the land of Gush X’een’s people. After defeating the invading warriors, Gush X’een took Wiisheyksh’s name as his title and shortened it to Sheiyksh, which was pronounced as 'Shakes.' The title of Shakes was passed down to younger generations, with each new Shakes being a leader of the Tlingit people.

The Tlingit people were known to make elaborate armor and helmets. Heavy sets of armor were made from straight pieces of wood tied together with rawhide. Their helmets and neck guards were more decorated, designed to look like fierce animals or human heads. This armor was reportedly strong enough to repel the bullets of the Russians who colonized the northwestern coast of America.

Bone Breastplate[]

Bone Breastplate[]

Hair Pipes are a type of decorative breastplate made by Native Ponca tribes. The bone is taken from the stems of corncob pipes that were purchased from traders in the late 1800s. Hair Pipes became popular among many tribes and eventually became a very common part of Native American regalia.

White Eagle's Bone Breastplate[]

White Eagle was the chief of the Ponca tribe. During his lifetime he was the medicine man and religious advisor of his people. White Eagle led his people through an exceptionally difficult forced relocation into a ‘sickly land.’ Later in life he became friends with the Miller Brothers and performed in their 101 Ranch Wild West Shows as an expert marksman.

Hair Pipes are a type of decorative breastplate made by Native Ponca tribes. The bone is taken from the stems of corncob pipes that were purchased from traders in the late 1800s. Hair Pipes became popular among many tribes and eventually became a very common part of Native American regalia.




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