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Jewelry Artifacts are used to boost looting and production. They also debuff Enemy's Defensive Buildings. The Artifacts are crafted, displayed and empowered at the Museum.

Benefits Edit

Resource Edit

Enemy's Base Hitpoints Edit

Enemy's Base Damage Edit

List of Jewelry Artifacts Edit

Europe


Brooch Edit

Scottish Agate Brooch, level 1 blue Queen Victoria's Brooch - Electric Blue Queen Victoria's Brooch, turquoise colour2 Scottish Agate Brooch, pink colour

Queen Victoria's Brooch, violet colour Queen Victoria's Brooch, level 2 bright red

Queen Victoria's Brooch - Turquoise

Scottish Agate Brooch Edit

English society in the 19th century was fascinated with Scotland. Sir Walter Scott set his best-selling historical novels there, Prince Albert purchased Balmoral Castle for Queen Victoria, and fashionable ladies adorned themselves with Scottish agate jewelry. This style was in such high demand that Birmingham and other English towns soon began manufacturing 'Scottish' pieces of their own.

Queen Victoria's Brooch Edit

The British Empire reached its height during the 63-year reign of Queen Victoria. While her constitutional power was limited, she influenced foreign policy, and her personal traits defined the culture of the era. She mourned the death of her beloved husband Albert in 1861 by wearing black for the rest of her life.

English society in the 19th century was fascinated with Scotland. Sir Walter Scott set his best-selling historical novels there, Prince Albert purchased Balmoral Castle for Queen Victoria, and fashionable ladies adorned themselves with Scottish agate jewelry. This style was in such high demand that Birmingham and other English towns soon began manufacturing 'Scottish' pieces of their own.

Neclace Edit

Monile Neclace - Blue Queen Zenobia's Neclace - Electric Blue Monile Neclace - Pink

Queen Zenobia's Neclace, turquoise colour Monile Neclace - Bright Red

Queen Zenobia's Neclace, turquoise

Monile Neclace Edit

Originally reserved for diplomats and senators, gold jewelry became more common in Roman society as the empire grew bigger and wealthier. Roman jewelers inherited techniques from the masterful Etruscan goldsmiths as well as the Hellenistic world. Emphasis was initially placed on metalwork, but shifted to the use of colorful stones as precious gems from distant lands became available.

Queen Zenobia's Neclace Edit

Zenobia ruled over much of the Near East from Palmyra, a wealthy and multicultural Silk Road trade hub in Syria. The highly educated queen made her court a famous center of learning. Though defeated by the Roman emperor Aurelian, she remains a popular heroine throughout the Middle East.

Originally reserved for diplomats and senators, gold jewelry became more common in Roman society as the empire grew bigger and wealthier. Roman jewelers inherited techniques from the masterful Etruscan goldsmiths as well as the Hellenistic world. Emphasis was initially placed on metalwork, but shifted to the use of colorful stones as precious gems from distant lands became available.

Lover's Knot Edit

Jane Austen's Lover Knot - Electric Blue Jane Austen's Lover's Knot, electric blue colour Jane Austen's Lover's Knot, turquoise colour Jane Austen's Lover's Knot, pink colour

Georgian Lover's Knot Edit

British fashion became quite elaborate during the Georgian period (1714-1837). This was the time of the macaronis, aristocratic men who sported enormous wigs, red high heels, and other extreme accessories. Wealthy women showed off their status by wearing intricate handcrafted jewelry. Diamonds were ubiquitous, as was heavy hand-cut glass called paste that simulated the appearance of expensive gems.

Jane Austen's Lover's Knot Edit

Jane Austen wrote novels that focused on the struggles of ordinary middle-class women for happiness and independence. Published anonymously at the time, they sold well and were popular among tastemakers. In the 2oth century, they were accepted as great books worthy of serious critical study.

British fashion became quite elaborate during the Georgian period (1714-1837). This was the time of the macaronis, aristocratic men who sported enormous wigs, red high heels, and other extreme accessories. Wealthy women showed off their status by wearing intricate handcrafted jewelry. Diamonds were ubiquitous, as was heavy hand-cut glass called paste that simulated the appearance of expensive gems.

Watch Edit

Pomander Watch - Blue Albrecht Diirer's Watch, electric blue colour Albrecht Diirer's Watch, turquoise colour Albrecht Diirer's Watch, level 1 pink

Pomander Watch Edit

The Pomander Watch is the world's oldest known watch. It was probably created around 1505 by Peter Henlein, a master locksmith from Nuremberg. The timepiece has a spherical copper casing plated with gold outside and silver inside. There are microscopic engravings under the dial; scholars don't know how these could have been made in 1505, but scientific analysis has confirmed the watch's authenticity.

Albrecht Dürer's Watch Edit

Albrecht Dürer was the leading artist of the German Renaissance. Though an accomplished painter, he is most famous for his woodcuts and engravings such as the Rhinoceros and Melencolia I. He served as official court artist for the Holy Roman Emperors Maximilian I and Charles V.

The Pomander Watch is the world's oldest known watch. It was probably created around 1505 by Peter Henlein, a master locksmith from Nuremberg. The timepiece has a spherical copper casing plated with gold outside and silver inside. There are microscopic engravings under the dial; scholars don't know how these could have been made in 1505, but scientific analysis has confirmed the watch's authenticity.

Bracelet Edit

Cleopatra Selene's Bracelet - Electric Blue Cleopatra Selene's Bracelet - Turquoise Pselion Bracelet - Pink

Cleopatra Selene's Bracelet, violet colour

Pselion Bracelet Edit

Following the conquests of Alexander the Great, Grecian goldsmiths gained access to materials and techniques from the Near East, Persia, and beyond. Their designs drew inspiration from the natural world and mythological figures. Jewelry pieces weren't just for living mortals - they also showed up in grave sites and temple treasuries as funerary adornments and sacred offerings.

Cleopatra Selene's Bracelet Edit

Cleopatra Selene was the daughter of the famous Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony. After her mother's suicide, the younger Cleopatra was married to the scholarly Numidian king Juba II. Together, they ruled over the Roman client kingdom of Mauretania in North Africa, making it into a cosmopolitan cultural hub.

Following the conquests of Alexander the Great, Grecian goldsmiths gained access to materials and techniques from the Near East, Persia, and beyond. Their designs drew inspiration from the natural world and mythological figures. Jewelry pieces weren't just for living mortals - they also showed up in grave sites and temple treasuries as funerary adornments and sacred offerings.

Asia


Rings Edit

Garakji Rings - Electric Blue Lady Hyegyeong's Rings - Turquoise

Garakji Rings - Violet Garakji Rings, blue colour Lady Hyegyeong's Rings, level 2 bright red

Garakji Rings Edit

Historically, married Korean women wore pairs of rings called garakji as symbols of marital harmony. For lower classes they were made of copper or iron, While nobles sported costly materials like jade or gold. Garakji were given as wedding gifts or a promise of engagement. If a woman became widowed, she would bury one ring with her deceased husband and continue wearing the other to show her faithfulness.

Lady Hyegyeong's Rings Edit

Lady Hyegyeong was the wife of the mad Crown Prince Sado and the mother of King Jeongio, one of the greatest rulers of Korea's Joseon Dynasty. Her memoirs, written in the Hangul script between 1795 and 1805, are a rare and invaluable resource for a woman's perspective on Korean court life.

Historically, married Korean women wore pairs of rings called garakji as symbols of marital harmony. For lower classes they were made of copper or iron, While nobles sported costly materials like jade or gold. Garakji were given as wedding gifts or a promise of engagement. If a woman became widowed, she would bury one ring with her deceased husband and continue wearing the other to show her faithfulness.

Hair Ornament Edit

Wu Zetian's Hair Ornament - Blue Wu Zetian's Hair Ornament - Turquoise Chai Hair Ornament - Pink

Wu Zetian's Hair Ornament - Blue2

Chai Hair Ornament, violet colour

Chai Hair Ornament Edit

Both men and women wore elaborate hairpins in ancient China. This practice dates back thousands of years to the Shang Dynasty and became particularly popular during the Han period. Fancy hairpins were often inlaid with rare and expensive kingfisher feathers, a process called dian cui' that requires tremendous skill on the part of the jeweler.

Wu Zetian's Hair Ornament Edit

Wu Zetian entered the Tang emperor Taizong's court as a minor concubine. Through a series of palace intrigues, she became the only female huangdi (emperor) in Chinese history. Though maligned by later historians, Wu stabilized the realm, expanded its borders, and reformed the civil service examinations.

Both men and women wore elaborate hairpins in ancient China. This practice dates back thousands of years to the Shang Dynasty and became particularly popular during the Han period. Fancy hairpins were often inlaid with rare and expensive kingfisher feathers, a process called dian cui' that requires tremendous skill on the part of the jeweler.

Bird Finial Edit

Modu's Bird Finial, elecric blue colour Xiongnu Bird Finial - Turquoise Xiongnu Bird Finial, pink colour

Modu's Bird Finial, electric blue colour Xiongnu Bird Finial, level 2 green

Xiongnu Bird Finial Edit

A finial is an ornament designed to mark the top of a hat, structure, or other object. Crowns with elaborate metal finials were worn by the kings of the Xiongnu, a powerful tribal confederation that founded an empire in the steppes of northeast Asia around 200 BCE. In Imperial China, the knob-like finials worn by court officials served as an indicator of their rank.

Modu's Bird Finial Edit

The Xiongnu were Central Asian nomads who created a vast empire under Modu circa 209 BCE. Shortly before this, their raids had prompted the Chinese emperor Qin Shi Huang to link fortifications in northern China to form the Great Wall. The Xiongnu may have been related to a later nomadic scourge, The Huns.

A finial is an ornament designed to mark the top of a hat, structure, or other object. Crowns with elaborate metal finials were worn by the kings of the Xiongnu, a powerful tribal confederation that founded an empire in the steppes of northeast Asia around 200 BCE. In Imperial China, the knob-like finials worn by court officials served as an indicator of their rank.

Africa


Mask Edit

Kuba Mask - Blue Kuba Mask, electric blue colour Shyaam a-Mbul a Ngoong's Mask, turquoise colour Shyaam a-Mbul a Ngoong's Mask, pink colour

Kuba Mask Edit

The Kuba people live in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. They originally migrated to the region during the 16th century and are famous for their masks and masquerades. Masks play an important role in Kuba society. Each mask is supposed to personify a specific deity or figure. They were worn during special rites and initiations.

Shyaam a-Mbul a Ngoong's Mask Edit

Shyaam a-Mbul was a Kuba ruler that first centralized the Kuba people and established the Bushoong ruling dynasty around 1625. Statues or carvings of him are often accompanied by a variation of a mancala game board because he is credited with teaching mancala to his people.

The Kuba people live in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. They originally migrated to the region during the 16th century and are famous for their masks and masquerades. Masks play an important role in Kuba society. Each mask is supposed to personify a specific deity or figure. They were worn during special rites and initiations.

Necklace Edit

Fulani Necklace - Electric Blue Fulani Necklace, turquoise colour Fulani Necklace - Pink

Fulani Necklace Edit

The Fulani people are one of the largest ethnic groups in Western Africa, with their numbers between 40 or 50 million. Their history in Africa dates back to at least 6,000 BCE. They are a largely nomadic people that rely on their cattle for sustenance. Jewelry pieces, such as this necklace, are used for decorative and protective purposes.

Seku Amadu's Necklace Edit

Seku Amadu was born in 1776 and went on to found the Massina Empire in the present-day area of the Mopti Region of Mali. He was raised by his father’s younger brother and became a cleric of Islam. During his reign, he vigorously promoted Islam and constructed over 600 madrasas throughout the empire.

The Fulani people are one of the largest ethnic groups in Western Africa, with their numbers between 40 or 50 million. Their history in Africa dates back to at least 6,000 BCE. They are a largely nomadic people that rely on their cattle for sustenance. Jewelry pieces, such as this necklace, are used for decorative and protective purposes.

Samburu-Necklace-Bronce-Violett

Samburu Necklace, level 2 purple

Samburu Necklace Edit

The Samburu are a semi-nomadic people that live in north-central Kenya. They are sometimes referred to as the Butterfly People because of their vibrantly colorful clothing and jewelry, but they prefer to call themselves the Lokop. Their beaded necklaces ar produced by the women of the tribe, but worn by both men and women. Samburu women collect the beaded necklaces and collars throughout their life, and different colors and sizes have different meannings.

America


Ear Ornament Edit

Lady of Cao's Moche Ear Ornament - Blue Moche Ear Ornament, level 1 electric blue Moche Ear Ornament, level 1 green Moche Ear Ornament, level 1 pink

Moche Ear Ornament Edit

The Moche people would often undergo several body modifications for a variety of reasons. Some piercings were done as a form of fashion, and others as a sign to show that a person had reached a certain age. Most Moche people would pierce their skin early in life and wait until adulthood before they would insert these elaborate ornaments.

Lady of Cao's Moche Ear Ornament Edit

The Lady of Cao is the name that archeologists gave to a mummified Moche woman found in South America. The mummy was surrounded by gold jewelry and covered in ornate cloth. Her identity is merely speculation, but due to the unusually high amount of treasures and adornment surrounding her burial site, it is believed that she was a high priestess or perhaps a ruler of the Moche people.

The Moche people would often undergo several body modifications for a variety of reasons. Some piercings were done as a form of fashion, and others as a sign to show that a person had reached a certain age. Most Moche people would pierce their skin early in life and wait until adulthood before they would insert these elaborate ornaments.

Bracelet Edit

Atsidi Sani's Navajo Bracelet, blue colour Atsidi Sani's Navajo Bracelet, electric blue colour Navajo Bracelet - Pink

Navajo Bracelet, bright red colour

Navajo Bracelet Edit

Native Americans have a long, rich history of creating beautiful art and jewelry. Although used in the jewelry of any other tribes, turquoise is most commonly associated with the Navajo people. The craftsmanship of the Navajo people is unique in that they were the first Native American tribe to combine traditional turquoise gemstones with silver to make ornate jewelry.

Atsidi Sani's Navajo Bracelet Edit

Navajo Chief Atsidi Sani is credited as the first Native American to learn the art of silversmithing. Atsidi Sani was primarily a blacksmith, evident in his name, which translates to ‘old smith.’ Chief Sani passed his knowledge of blacksmithing and silversmithing to his brother and four sons, and eventually became a paid teacher of his craft.

Native Americans have a long, rich history of creating beautiful art and jewelry. Although used in the jewelry of many other tribes, turquoise is most commonly associated with the Navajo people. The craftsmanship of the Navajo people is unique in that they were the first Native American tribe to combine traditional turquoise gemstones with silver to make ornate jewelry.

JewelryEdit

Pachacuti's Incan Jewelry, electric blue colour

Inca JewelryEdit

There are many examples of golden sculptures and jewelry from the Inca people. Ornate statues, body ornaments, and masks have been discovered throughout the years of excavation of and exploration into the Inca empires of the past. It is said that almost everything of the emperor’s was made with gold, from dining utensils to the walls of his throne room itself. Some golden masks and disks were also created for use in worship to the god of the sun, Inti.

Pachacuti's Incan JewelryEdit

Pachacuti was the son of Inca Emperor Viracocha Inca. Born by the name Cusi Yupanqui, Pachacuti was never intended to become the leader of his people, as his older brother had already been crowned as prince. During an invasion of his homeland, he stood and fought off the invading tribe while his father and brother fled to safety. Legends arose that his Victory was so severe that even the rocks rose from the ground and fought by his side. Thus Cusi Yupanqui earned his right to the throne and gave himself a new name, Pachacuti: ‘the earth shaker.’

There are many examples of golden sculptures and jewelry from the Inca people. Ornate statues, body ornaments, and masks have been discovered throughout the years of excavation of and exploration into the Inca empires of the past. It is said that almost everything of the emperor’s was made with gold, from dining utensils to the walls of his throne room itself. Some golden masks and disks were also created for use in worship to the god of the sun, Inti.

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