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Equipment Artifacts are used to boost troops in World War. The Artifacts are crafted, displayed and empowered at the Museum.

Note: the equipment type (e.g., mess kit versus trench phone) has zero effect on the artifact's statistics.


Historical Descriptions Edit

Mess Kit Edit

Mess Kit

Doughboy Mess Kit Edit

As the old adage goes: an army marches on its stomach. During World War I, all U.S. military personnel were issued a compact mess kit to eat and prepare their meals. Mess kits came in all different shapes and sizes, baut a key component of every kit was how compact it was. Moderns mess kits are usually single-use and are made of disposable plastic, while the older kits were reusable and typically made of aluminum or other metals. Since there were no assigned cooks in the trenches, each soldier was responsible for cooking with and cleaning their mess kits every day.

Impromptu Chef's Mess Kit Edit

In the trenches, there were no designated kitchens or cooks. British soldiers typically were give more rations than their German enemies, a fact that was highly played up in British propaganda. However, After the first year, most of the meat given to soldiers was cheap tinned meat, and the vegetables were often dried instead of fresh. Many soldiers would use their own money to purchase sauces or other condiments to make their rations bearable. Some soldiers were particularly talented at cooking, and so other soldiers would turn to them to cook their meals at the cost of extra rations or valuables.

As the old adage goes: an army marches on its stomach. During World War I, all U.S. military personnel were issued a compact mess kit to eat and prepare their meals. Mess kits came in all different shapes and sizes, baut a key component of every kit was how compact it was. Moderns mess kits are usually single-use and are made of disposable plastic, while the older kits were reusable and typically made of aluminum or other metals. Since there were no assigned cooks in the trenches, each soldier was responsible for cooking with and cleaning their mess kits every day.

Trench Phone Edit

Trench Phone

Trench Phone Edit

In war, communication is the key to victory. During World War I, many forms of communication were used, including flag signaling, carrier pigeons, and using lights of whistling to signal Morse code. But the clearer and most effective way of communicating was a relatively recent invention: the telephone. Soldiers would lay massive lengths of phone wire lines with redundant crisscross patterns to ensure that they could give and receive orders in the battlefield. The redundancy of these wires was a necessity, as wires would often get destroyed by enemy artillery fire.

Hello Girls' Trench Phone Edit

The 'Hello Girls' were the female switchboard operators of the U.S Army Signal Corps (USACS). The USASC is responsible for developing, testing, and operating the U.S. Army's communications. General Pershing knew that communication would be the key to victory, and so, by his call, the Signal Corps Female Telephone Operators Unit, colloquially knows as 'Hello Girls', was established. The 'Hello Girls' were originally considered civilians that were employed by the military and did not receive honorable discharges or veteran status until many years later.

In war, communication is the key to victory. During World War I, many forms of communication were used, including flag signaling, carrier pigeons, and using lights of whistling to signal Morse code. But the clearer and most effective way of communicating was a relatively recent invention: the telephone. Soldiers would lay massive lengths of phone wire lines with redundant crisscross patterns to ensure that they could give and receive orders in the battlefield. The redundancy of these wires was a necessity, as wires would often get destroyed by enemy artillery fire.

Splatter Mask Edit

Splatter Mask

Splatter Mask Edit

Tanks were new weapons during World War I, and as such, they had many issues that had yet to be resolved. Some of these issues put its own tank crew at risk, such as 'bullet splash.' 'Bullet splash occurs when tine metal fragments inside of the tank get forcibly knocked off whenever the main cannon fires or if the tank was hit with gunfire. These fragments would cause damage to the skin and eyes of the crew. The solution was to have each of the tanks' crew members wear metal splatter masks to protect their face from shrapnel. Future tanks were built with fewer tie constraints and making the crew's safety a higher priority.

Sir John Monash's Splatter Mask Edit

Sir John Monash is the most renowned Australian commander in history. His tactics were innovative and his reputation as a commander was highly regarded. Monash was also known to be a kind and pleasant man who cared for the safety and comfort of his men. He wrote: '...the true role of infantry was not to expend itself upon heroic physical effort... but on the contrary, to advance under the maximum possible protection of the maximum possible array of mechanical resources'. By the end of the Great War, Monash was highly decorated not only by his own country but by many allied nations. His foreign honors include being appointed as a Knight Grand Cross by the British, receiving the Croix de Guerre by France and Belgium, and earning a Distinguished Service Medal from the U.S.

Tanks were new weapons during World War I, and as such, they had many issues that had yet to be resolved. Some of these issues put its own tank crew at risk, such as 'bullet splash.' 'Bullet splash occurs when tine metal fragments inside of the tank get forcibly knocked off whenever the main cannon fires or if the tank was hit with gunfire. These fragments would cause damage to the skin and eyes of the crew. The solution was to have each of the tanks' crew members wear metal splatter masks to protect their face from shrapnel. Future tanks were built with fewer tie constraints and making the crew's safety a higher priority.

Alarm Rattle Edit

Alarm Rattle

Alarm Rattle Edit

Poison gas was a common weapon used by both Allied and Central Powers during World War I. Some gas attacks were difficult to detect until it was too late. As the war progressed. Soldiers now came better prepared against chemical weapons, but it would still take time to equip their protective masks or suits as a response, soldiers started carrying horns or loud rattles that they would sound at the first sight of incoming gas. This warning would give their allies the time to ready their equipment and protect themselves from the attack.

1st A.I.F.'s Gas Alarm Rattle Edit

The First Australian Imperial Force was the Australian Army's expeditionary force during World War I. Initially, the 1st A.I.F. was only one infantry division and one light horse brigade. As the war continued, the 1st A.I.F. was reinforced by more and more divisions. The Australian forces fought in many of the greatest battles of World War I and earned a reputation of being an especially effective military force.

Poison gas was a common weapon used by both Allied and Central Powers during World War I. Some gas attacks were difficult to detect until it was too late. As the war progressed. Soldiers now came better prepared against chemical weapons, but it would still take time to equip their protective masks or suits as a response, soldiers started carrying horns or loud rattles that they would sound at the first sight of incoming gas. This warning would give their allies the time to ready their equipment and protect themselves from the attack.

Field Surgery Kit Edit

Surgery Kit

Field Surgery Kit Edit

When major injuries occured on the battlefield there would frequently be no time to get the injured party to a field hospital. Battlefield medics would carry a Field Surgery Kit for just such an emergency. The contents of surgery ktis would vary, but most always contained sutures, scalpels, needles and holders, and various medicinal drugs. Most commonly, thes kits were used to retrieve bullets from wounded soldiers or to perform emergency amputations. As the war continued and supplies became mor scare, many emergency kits did not come with medications and only included sutures and scalpels. This meant field surgeries would have to be done with little to no pain medication and only salt water to rinse and clean wounds.

Ernest Hemingway's Field Surgery Kit Edit

Ernest Hemingway is primarily remembered as a novelist and journalist, however, he also served as an ambulance driver in Paris and later at the Italian Front during World War I. Eventually, Hemingway was injured and forced to retire. He later wrote about his experience saying: 'When you go to war as a boy you have a great illusion of immortality. Other people get killed; not you... Then when you are badly wounded the first time you lose that illusion and you know it can happen to you.'

When major injuries occured on the battlefield there would frequently be no time to get the injured party to a field hospital. Battlefield medics would carry a Field Surgery Kit for just such an emergency. The contents of surgery ktis would vary, but most always contained sutures, scalpels, needles and holders, and various medicinal drugs. Most commonly, thes kits were used to retrieve bullets from wounded soldiers or to perform emergency amputations. As the war continued and supplies became mor scare, many emergency kits did not come with medications and only included sutures and scalpels. This meant field surgeries would have to be done with little to no pain medication and only salt water to rinse and clean wounds.

Binoculars Edit

Binoculars

Trench Binoculars Edit

World War I was the time of trench warfare. Deep trenches ware capable of protecting soldiers from artillery fire and gunfire. Instead of risking the lives of the soldiers by having them perform reconnaissance while exposed from the trenches, they could now use the 'Trench Binoculars' which proved to be a safer alternative. These periscope binoculars allowed the soldier to stay safe without having to expose themselves over the parapet. Similar technology was used to create innovative trench weapons such as periscope rifles and machine guns.

Major Hesketh-Prichard's Binoculars Edit

Hesketh-Prichard was a British officer during World War I. After learning that most regiments would lose over a dozen men each month to enemy snipers, he began taking measures to both better protect soldiers from snipers and to better train British troops in the art of marksmanship. At first, his contributions were small; he would correct sights on rifle scopes and purchase better rifles using his own money. Eventually, after campaigning to the British Army, he was formally allowed to start 'The First Army School of Sniping, Observing and Scouting.' Reports state that Hesketh-Prichard was able to reduce sniper casualties from five per battalion each week to only forty-four casualties across sixty battalions in three months.

World War I was the time of trench warfare. Deep trenches ware capable of protecting soldiers from artillery fire and gunfire. Instead of risking the lives of the soldiers by having them perform reconnaissance while exposed from the trenches, they could now use the 'Trench Binoculars' which proved to be a safer alternative. These periscope binoculars allowed the soldier to stay safe without having to expose themselves over the parapet. Similar technology was used to create innovative trench weapons such as periscope rifles and machine guns.

Ammunition Box Edit

Ammunition Box

Aluminum Ammunition Box Edit

Ammunition boxes are specially designed crates used to safely store ammunition. Most military ammo boxes are made of durable metal with zinc lining or padding to prevent accidental discharge. Ammo boxes come in many shapes and sizes, with some being form-fitting rectangular crates, and others resembling food containers commonly called 'spam cans.' Aluminum ammunition boxes were rare, but were occasionally used by the German Empire during World War I.

LZ 72's Aluminum Ammunition Box Edit

LZ 72 was a German Empire 'Super-Zeppelin' airship used for bombing missions during World War I. When airships first appeared during the war, they were particularly effective. Dozens of bombing runs were made successfully for a period of time. However, the British discovered that the use of incendiary rounds was particularly effective against zeppelins. Soon after, airship after airship was shot down in flames, which caused the German Empire to revise all airships to fly at a much higher height at the cost of offensive efficiency.

Ammunition boxes are specially designed crates used to safely store ammunition. Most military ammo boxes are made of durable metal with zinc lining or padding to prevent accidental discharge. Ammo boxes come in many shapes and sizes, with some being form-fitting rectangular crates, and others resembling food containers commonly called 'spam cans.' Aluminum ammunition boxes were rare, but were occasionally used by the German Empire during World War I.

Signalling Lamp Edit

Signalling Lamp

Signal Corps Signalling Lamp Edit

Although the principal means of communication on the battlefield was via telefon, often times the phone wires would get destroyed by enemy artillery fire. As such, reliable alternative means of communication was required. One such method was using signal lamps. Thes lamps would use lenses to focus either sunlight or lamplight over a long distance to a signaling post. The signaller and the signaling post would communicate back and forth, usually via Morse code.

The United States Army Signal Corps (USASC) was established in 1860 and has been in integral part of the U.S. military ever since. During World War I, the USASC was responsible for all military aviation as the Army Air Service had not yet been created. Additionally, the Signal Corps developed new types of radio communications and eventually pioneered radar technology. Although the principal means of communication on the battlefield was via telefon, often times the phone wires would get destroyed by enemy artillery fire. As such, reliable alternative means of communication was required. One such method was using signal lamps. Thes lamps would use lenses to focus either sunlight or lamplight over a long distance to a signaling post. The signaller and the signaling post would communicate back and forth, usually via Morse code.

Gift Box Edit

Gift Box

Princess Mary Gift Box Edit

During World War I, Princess Mary of the British royal family started the public 'Soldiers and Sailors Christmas fund'. Its mission was to ensure that each and every member of the British Armed Forces would receive a Christmas gift. Two versions of the gift boxes were created: a box made of silver for officers and one made of brass for all the others. The Princess Mary Christmas gift boxes were adorned with an image of the Princess as well as the names of the Allied countries during World War I. The gifts inside of the box varied from person to person. Many were filled with tobacco, candies, and lighters, but every box came with a Christmas card and a photo of Princess Mary.

Princess Mary's Christmas Gift Box Edit

Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood, was the only daughter of Queen Mary and King George V, who was the King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions during the 1900s. Princess Mary was known for the frequent charitable acts. In addition to the Christmas gift box fund she created, she took courses on nursing and would volunteer two days a week at a local hospital. Her contributions extended not only toward those in the military but also toward guidance organizations aimed at helping young girls and women.

During World War I, Princess Mary of the British royal family started the public 'Soldiers and Sailors Christmas fund'. Its mission was to ensure that each and every member of the British Armed Forces would receive a Christmas gift. Two versions of the gift boxes were created: a box made of silver for officers and one made of brass for all the others. The Princess Mary Christmas gift boxes were adorned with an image of the Princess as well as the names of the Allied countries during World War I. The gifts inside of the box varied from person to person. Many were filled with tobacco, candies, and lighters, but every box came with a Christmas card and a photo of Princess Mary.

Entrenching Tool Edit

Entrenching Tool

The Frontline's Entrenching Tool Edit

Life in the trenches was more than just combat. Soldiers had to eat, sleep, and live in these trenches for long periods of time. As such, many trenches had cooking areas, barbers, smaller dugouts for sleeping, and latrines. Most soldiers would only be on the frontline for a week or two at a time before being pulled back to support or reserve lines. Even so, there were rare cases of soldiers, particularly of nations that had little reinforcements to give, that would stay on the frontline for months at a time.

Trench warfare was a constant throughout World War I. There were many innovative ways to quickly build trenches, but still the simplest method was the most common - digging with shovels. Standard issue entrenching tools often came with sharpened edges so that they could be used as melee weapons when a bayonet would be too large and cumbersome. The safest way to dig a trench in combat was called sapping, which allowed soldiers to dig while still inside of their trench. The largest drawback to sapping was that only two men could dig at a time, since the space they had to work in was limited. Often times soldiers had to dig trenches out in the open with nothing but the cover of night to protect them.

Camera Edit

Aerial Camera

Type B Aerial Camera Edit

By World War I, using cameras during aerial reconnaissance had proved to give vital information about enemy movements. However, the early British Type A Aerial Camera was slow to use and required the pilot to perform eleven different actions for a single photograph, all while piloting the aircraft. The new Type B cameras were semi-automatic and could take photos at much higher resolution and at oblique angles. Using aerial recon photos, wartime strategists have been able to reveal hidden defenses and reconstruct maps of enemy encampments.

F.C.V. Laws Type B Aerial Camera Edit

Frederick Charles Victor Laws was an officer of the British Royal Air Force. During World War I, F.C.V. Laws established an aerial recon unit and immediately started work on creating cameras to use while airborne. At the time, the British had no experience with aerial recon and many experiments with cameras were done without official Air Force support. By the time World War I had finished, F.C.V. Laws was hailed as 'the most experienced aerial photographic adviser in England and possibly the world.' Laws retired after World War I but rejoined the Royal Air Force as wind commander during World War II.

By World War I, using cameras during aerial reconnaissance had proved to give vital information about enemy movements. However, the early British Type A Aerial Camera was slow to use and required the pilot to perform eleven different actions for a single photograph, all while piloting the aircraft. The new Type B cameras were semi-automatic and could take photos at much higher resolution and at oblique angles. Using aerial recon photos, wartime strategists have been able to reveal hidden defenses and reconstruct maps of enemy encampments.